Posted in books, writing, writing tips

Improving organization and productivity for writers

Staying organized as a freelance writer can be very challenging! Here are a few tips for improving organizational skills, as well as some apps you might find useful for keeping your writing life on track.

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  1. Remove distractions. A writer may have all the talent in the world, but if they can’t stay focused and meet deadlines and actually complete projects, it skill won’t matter. Silence your phone, put your computer in airplane mode to limit trips to Facebook and other distracting sites, makes notes about what you may need to look up or attend to later.
  2. Plan your day according to priority and physical needs (and BE REALISTIC). Deadlines come first, but how you reach them can make a big difference in your productivity and stress levels. Make a list of the task (writing and life) you need to complete that day, order them according to priority, and set realistic goals. Be realistic with your schedule and don’t overbook yourself. Then, consider when you work best and will have the least amount of distractions or interruptions. Create a schedule and make others aware of your schedule. Working from home doesn’t mean you’re not “at work.”
  3. Prepare ahead of time. Before you sit down to your scheduled writing time, make sure you have everything you need. If a story element needed to be researched, that should be taken care of in its own time slot prior to writing time. If Laundry needs to be started because you have to attend an event that evening, take care of it and schedule breaks to switch loads as needed. Reading assignments (with notes) should be scheduled during downtime when it doesn’t interfere or disrupt writing time. If something comes up during writing time that should have been done beforehand, make a note to schedule it for later and don’t switch tasks unless absolutely necessary.
  4. Wait to edit. Writing time and editing time need to be kept separate. Editing while writing slows down the process and keeps the focus on small details rather than character or story development. Make a note if you need to come back to something, but keep writing in the moment/
  5. Keep notes and refer back to them. Instead of breaking from a task because you remembered something or had a new idea, keep a notebook or note app on hand and make a note about new tasks or ideas. Review them at the end of your work day or writing session and add the new items to the schedule for the next day or week ahead.
  6. Keep a consistent schedule. Research has shown that we can train our minds to better focus on specific tasks if we do them at consistent times. Life happens, of course, but the more you can routinize your writing schedule, the easier it will be to get into “writing mode” and the more productive you’ll be.
  7. Schedule breaks. Don’t forget to give yourself time to clear your mind and breathe. Even if it’s just ten minutes to refresh your coffee or walk to the mailbox and get some fresh air, you need to give your mind and body an occasional rest. The longer your mind focuses on one task without a break, the more tired it gets. The longer your body stays stationary, the more it affects your physical, mental, and emotional well-being. Research recommends at least a 10 minutes break every two hours, with longer meal breaks.

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Apps to try

  • MindNode (iOS) $10: visually map out thoughts/storylines
  • The Brainstormer (iOS) $2: exercises to help with writer’s block
  • Pomodoro Timer (iOS and Android): time management for writers to boost productivity
  • Evernote (iOS and Android) Free with premium features: note keeping app with text, audio, photo, handwriting notes and reminders
  • Lists for Writers (iOS and Android) $3: Inspiration for a variety of writing related sticking points (names, settings, jobs, grammar, etc.)
  • WordOne (iOS) $2.99 or Writer Tools (Android) Free: track daily writing progress and plan stories
Posted in books, marketing

Creating a Marketing Plan: Part 2

To get started on your marketing plan, check out Part 1 HERE. Once you have your goals set, it’s time to start preparing.


Preparatory Marketing

Networking with Bloggers

Bloggers are authors’ friends. Not just the ones with thousands of followers. Sometimes the smaller bloggers will do more to promote your post and become an ally for future books. Don’t just spam every blogger you find. Build a relationship by checking out their blog, commenting, and interacting.

Types of posts to prepare for bloggers: Guest posts, interviews, excerpts, Q&A, Top Tens lists, writing advice, etc.

KEEP TRACK of which bloggers you work with for future releases.

Social Media

Facebook

Regular posting on 2-3 platforms.

Share teasers such as quotes, images, character bios, etc.

Share sneak peeks of content.

This helps you build a fan base and interest in the projects you’re working on.

Branding

Blond Business Woman

Establishing expertise through content, i.e. columns/articles/blogs, sharing useful information/articles, etc.

You want readers to know what they can learn/expect from you. Do you share writing advice, post about your own reading, talk about your hobbies, blog your thoughts on a variety of subjects, etc.


Pre-Release/Launch Marketing

Blog tours

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Need to be set up 2-6 months in advance. Bigger tour companies will require more time. It also gives more time to bloggers to read the book and review. Blog tours are for EXPOSURE, not sales, so reviews are really important during blog tours.

Book Trailers

Click for a book trailer sample
Click for a book trailer sample


Post release date in video or description to help promote the release date and/or pre-order status.

Don’t just use your blurb for the script. Create a script that fits your video/photos and gives a unique look at the book through this format. Some book trailers use text only, voiceover narration, or live action.

Resources for making book trailers include: Free Music Archive for music, Windows Movie Maker, Animoto, Stupeflix, etc. for video compilation.

Reviews

Open Blue Book

Reach out to bloggers, beta readers, friends, and other authors who are interested in your genre. If they are new to reviewing, explain the process and how easy it is to leave a review as well as how important reviews are to the success of a book.

DO NOT PAY FOR REVIEWS! It’s against most sites review policies and is considered unethical.

When dealing with Amazon, family and close friends are not allowed to review your book because they may have a financial interest in your success. Same goes for authors affiliated with the same publisher you are with, street team members, or anyone else Amazon deems may have too close of an interest.

Goodreads does not limit reviews from friends and family.

Reviews can’t be posted on amazon until the book is LIVE, but encourage posting on Goodreads pre-release. It’s easy to copy and paste later.

Pre-Orders

Dollar Sign

A discounted price is usually offered during the pre-release period. Make sure to add the links to your website/pre-order page.

2-4 weeks is a common time period for pre-orders but trends have recently been leaning toward longer periods.

The Benefit of pre-orders is that ALL pre-sales are tallied on release day = big boost in rankings.


Launch/Release Marketing

Email Blast

Newsletter

Mailing list! Start building your mailing list early. This is a captive audience of readers who are interested in your books. Targeted Marketing=Better Click-Throughs

Release Party

TGH FB Party

In-person &/or FB event, Twitter chat (specifics to come…) Gather your fans and readers in one place to celebrate the release. It’s great to get other authors involved for games/prizes.

Media Appearance/Interviews

Podcasts, blogs, radio, YouTube, etc. Explore local media outlets like radio and TV, but don’t be afraid to branch out and talk to online sources like internet radio shows, podcasts, bloggers, Google+ shows, etc. There are many book and writing related media outlets interested in talking to authors.

Incentives to Buy

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Freebie w/ purchase, email receipt for gift, etc. Be creative with your incentives. If you have another talent like music or drawing, pair them up for a bonus gift after purchase. These types of incentives are usually offered during the first week after release.

Add cover art to Social Media images to help announce the release and get people interested in the book.

Update your bio with release info/links so readers who are already following you will have the most current information about your books.

Putting your plan into action requires planning, but the time and effort can pay off with a great release.

WPR Header ImageTo listen to the full podcast on Creating A Marketing Plan That’s Actually Doable, check out the Write. Publish. Repeat. Podcast Part 1 and Part 2.